Autumn Eve

Listen! The wind is rising,
and the air is wild with leaves,
We have had our summer evenings,
now for October eves!

~ Humbert Wolfe

The autumnal equinox arrives precisely at 4:21 a.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 23. Fall being my favorite season, I’m excited for: cinnamon sugar donuts with apple cider, apple picking (maybe), rounds of golf among the colorful leaves, the chill in the morning air, pumpkin carving, . . .

Unfortunately, the sunrise will not move north (back into direct view of our living room window) until after the winter solstice, which is December 22nd, 2015.

Hannah Bear Succeeds in New Orleans!

The Hannah Bear coloring book that Lindsey created last spring to help children who experience a death in their family won the “Best Practice” competition at the Selected Independent Funeral Homes National Convention! Congrats, Lindsey! Harvey, Carson and I are proud of you.

You can learn more about the book at The Hannah Bear, which also has contact information for Lindsey. Also, the bear you see below is Peg lent her authorship experience to Lindsey.

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2015 Union Championship

Nine guys. Many laughs. One hole-in-one.

I left early this morning to play the 2015 Union Championship. A few guys played a round Friday afternoon, but I was joining for the 36 holes at the Kingsley Club today. There was 18 holes at Arcadia Bluffs planned for Sunday, but that was cancelled for lack of attendance. The benefit of having the event close to home is that many of us don’t have to drive too far. The downside is the lack of a “captive audience.” Still, it was great to have a full day of golf on a tremendous course. We got a mix of weather – rain earlier in the day, wind throughout, and our fair share of sun.

This year’s participants were:

Joel Bush
Andrew Calcutt
Mike Dean
Sean Hutchinson
Chris Kellogg
Justin Mack
Eric Olson
Chris Rogers
Jonathan Wicksall

If’s fun catching up with these guys – some high school friends and others solely through this golf group. I hope that the group stays together for many years, and we continue to make the effort and take the time to plan these events at premier courses.

To review some of the play: Mike Dean made his first hole in one on the 9th hole in the morning. Following my lip-out PW, he hit a PW just left of the pin and spun it in. Congrats! My play was up and down all day. 78-76. I made my share of birdies, but also made too many doubles. Hutch had the round of the day in the afternoon when he posted a solid 69 (two under). I was glad to have him as my partner!

Morning “two best-ball of three” went to the team of Kellogg, Hutchinson, and Wicksall (I believe).

Afternoon “one best-ball of two” went to the team of Rogers and Hutchinson, although the team of Kellogg and Dean was close until the 17th hole.

Thanks to the Kingsley Club and Justin Mack for hosting our group, serving delicious breakfast sandwiches, and providing a stern and enjoyable test for the 2015 Union Championship.

Here’s a video from the day.

Beautiful Morning

In a moment’s time, the burning tangerine sun rises above the horizon, sits below the pink clouds shuffling south, then disappears. Playing peek-a-boo; its rays streaming through the silhouetted oak tree with vibrating leaves. Through our window decorated with Harvey’s fingerprints. Through the scratched lenses of my glasses. And on to me. Painting me in the warmth of morning. Compelling me to smile and be grateful for the view. And for the people I share it with.

Blog Update

Thanks to some professional help, we’ve moved the blog to my old domain, yugflog.com. We no longer live at The Double Dogleg, so the move was appropriate. Below is the old sidebar text that I removed, which I’m saving just because.

the dou·ble dog·leg
noun
: the Rogers’ family home
: our memories
: place where we laugh
: where our sun rises

dou·ble
adjective \’də-bəl\
: made of two parts that are similar

dog·leg
adjective \’dog- leg\
: crooked or bent like a dog’s hind leg

Our “driveway” is the implied noun that is described by “double” and dogleg,” as it does have two doglegs that must be navigated upon leaving and returning.

Closed on The Double Dogleg and the New Home!

We closed on the sale of The Double Dogleg today, and also on the purchase of the yet-to-be-named new house (actually not so new, but new to us). We had been watching the new house since early or mid-spring, but didn’t fully realize the vision. We agreed that if the new house was still on the market when we returned from Walt Disney World in mid-April, we would list The Double Dogleg and put an offer in on the new house. Our offer was competitive, and we were lucky to find a buyer for our house in relatively short order. Once the respective purchase agreements were signed, we set our eyes on a late-June closing date. This was eventually delayed by about a month, and we finally closed on both houses at 10am on July 15, 2015.

Throughout the sale process and the packing (mostly by Lindsey), Lindsey was pregnant and Carson was born on June 8, 2015. So, while we’ve been living out of various boxes strewn throughout The Double Dogleg, we’ve had a crib in the living room and spent most nights taking turns sleeping on the couch. I’ll remember that there is stuff everywhere. Diapers in the dining room. Kitchen stuff in the Yogi room. A basement full of my stuff (just. can’t. let. go.).

I will also remember, and miss, The Double Dogleg’s solitude, wooded views, epic snow blowing opportunities, back porch bon fires, goldfish in the pond, raking (and raking more), the many improvements and clearing we did, the various tenants, sledding and skiing in the woods, Harvey growing up his first two years there, Lindsey’s car slip on Christmas Eve 2011, killing dad’s snow blower, relentlessly clearing saplings, maple syruping, Mt. Yogi and our other signs, shoveling everything everywhere, the sliver of beach and the stuff growing on it, jumping off the raft, hiking in the woods, looking up at the canopy, and many other memories and adventures that have been previously documented here. The Double Dogleg was our first house together and the house to which we brought both Harvey and Carson home. And those memories, along with the many others, will stay close to our hearts.

And now it’s time to being the new adventure of making the new house our home sweet home.

What we call the beginning is often the end
And to make and end is to make a beginning.
The end is where we start from.

~ T. S. Eliot

Book Review: “Dream Golf: The Making of Bandon Dunes”

FIVE STARS. The only thing that would make it better would be pictures! And there are plenty of those online.

I recently finished, Dream Golf: The Making of Bandon Dunes, and it has awoken in me an interest in golf architecture. The book is authored by Stephen Goodwin, and is an excellent account of Mike Keiser’s growing passion and development fundamentals and the architectural details of bringing links courses to the west coast of the United States. I could hardly put it down, and was further intrigued by the extended details about the construction of Pacific Dunes and Old Macdonald, both designed by Tom Doak, whose design firm, Renaissance Golf Design, is located in Traverse City, MI. And little did I know that my favorite course growing up, High Pointe Golf Club in Acme, MI was his first design. If only it were still open, I would love to go back and explore its many still-familiar features. And I learned of “The Dunes Club,” Keiser’s first course, located in New Buffalo, MI (!) . . . a nod to Pine Valley and one of, or the, top nine-hole club in the country. (Who knew?!)

Upon finishing the book, I went to the public library and checked out two golf architecture books to flip through, initially, with hopes of reading more in depth soon. I’ve even scouted farmland nearby, dreaming of digging a nine-hole links course with little more than the spade in my garage and good intentions. Alas, I may need to make my millions before I venture down that road. But at least Dream Golf has brought a new part of the game to life for me.

I’ve since learned that there are the following courses at Bandon Dunes, all of which comprise “a golf trip that must occur”:

– Bandon Dunes – D. Kidd
– Pacific Dunes – T. Doak
– Bandon Trials – B. Crenshaw & B. Coore
– Old Macdonald – T. Doak & J. Urbina
– The Preserve – B. Crenshaw & B. Coore
– The Punch Bowl – T. Doak & J. Urbina
– Shorty’s – D. Kidd

Following are some of my favorite excerpts from the book.

“As a golf course developer, he was starting out pretty much from scratch. He had never invested in any kind of golf deal, and he wasn’t even a member of a golf club. But golf was in his blood, and when he said no to the investment bankers dangling their schemes in front of him, he knew in a general way what direction he wanted to take. He was headed toward that shining, elusive realm known as the kingdom of golf.”

“But the best architects still believed that good land—undulating land, not steep but with pronounced topographical features, and with porous soils, not a heavy clay—was a sine qua non for a good golf course.”

“To learn golf architecture one must know golf itself, its companionships, its joys, its sorrows, its battles—one must play golf and love it.”

“He wrote thoughtfully and persuasively about the principles of design, declaring that golf holes were either heroic, strategic, or penal in nature, and that a good architect mixed these three types of holes according to his site, blending them into one harmonious composition.”

“Mike was in heaven. He loved the simplicity and grandeur of the golf courses and the complete lack of pretension in all the other arrangements. The clubhouses were modest, the food was plain, the hotels were drafty, the weather was the usual Irish mix of rain and mist with occasional peeks of sunshine, but the golf was splendid.”

” “The Almighty intended this place for gawf,” Old Tom declared when he first laid eyes on the dunes of Machrihanish.”

” “It seemed that this land had been lying here for years waiting for someone to lay a golf course upon it,” Bobby Jones wrote after his first sight of the valley that now forms the amphitheater at Augusta National.”

“A great golf course is “nature perfected.” It is neither wholly natural nor can it be wholly unnatural or manufactured.”

“A walk in the vast and barren sand hills of Nebraska is not nearly as compelling as a round of golf at Sand Hills Golf Club.” (A course I had the privilege of playing in the fall of 2014.)

“For Mike, the lesson was crystal clear: If you wanted to create something exceptional, something extraordinary, you had to be fearless. You had to be prepared to follow your dream.”

“Though educated as a lawyer—he was assistant district attorney and later assistant city attorney in charge of prosecution in his hometown of Topeka, Kansas—his lifelong passion had always been golf course design, and, after becoming a contributing editor on architecture for Golf Digest in 1985, he had become one of the most influential critics in American golf.”

“Though he didn’t say so in the letter, David imagined the clubhouse and village as having an effect similar to the one that towns in Scotland had. In towns like Machrihanish or North Berwick or Carnoustie or St. Andrews, the golf course starts at the town’s doorstep, so to speak, pushes off into the wilds of nature, and then, at the round’s end, returns to civilization.”

“He relied heavily on his land-use attorney, Al Johnson, whom he’d selected partly for his unflappable calm. (“Al wore sweaters like Mr. Rogers. He was the ultimate down-home lawyer, which was exactly what I wanted.” (Note that I like this quote because I’m a lawyer and my last name is Rogers.)

“In Anatomy, Tom’s chapter on “The Green Complex” carries as its epigraph a quote from C. B. Macdonald: “Putting greens are to golf courses what faces are to portraits.””

“Throughout the round, he made sure that I noticed the weave and roll of the greens, and the variations in the Chicago Golf Club version of the Macdonald/Raynor iconic holes—the Punchbowl, the Cape, the Biarritz, the Double Plateau, the Redan, the Eden, the Road.”

Cleaning Out the Basement

We clean out the basement form time to time, trying to keep the “stuff” from piling too high! I’m notorious for holding on to things . . . especially, all of my collections of everything from childhood. I enjoy the re-discovery upon returning to the items, but sometimes it’s apparent that things have to go. Plus, we have to make room for Harvey and his little brother’s collections!

The following quote is a good approach to dealing with the less important possessions that pile up . . . like extra jackets, clothing, kitchen appliances, old sports equipment, parts of lost tools, etc.

“Look at a possession. Pick something. Anything. Have you used that item in the last 90 days? If you haven’t, will you use it in the next 90? If not, then it’s OK to let go. . . . [B]e honest with yourself. If your material possessions don’t serve a purpose or bring you joy, then they are likely in the way of a more meaningful life.”

Source: http://www.theminimalists.com/ninety/